Category Archives: calligraphy

Christmas Greetings 2012


My-Wish-Coloured-3.jpg

 

My wish for all who dwell here on earth. Peace, joy, health, and prosperity.       My greatest desire is to see, in my time, a world striving for peace.

Wishing all these things and more, to all my friends and visitors, wherever you are. With many thanks for continuing to drop in here at Bill’s Space. Hoping I can find plenty to keep you occupied through the coming year.

Cheers.    Bill.

 

Calligraphy and handwriting for Children



I am often asked how long I have been doing calligraphy and how I got interested in the first place.

As a youngster, the only books in the house were a 10 volume Arthur Mee Childrens Encyclopaedia.  The many articles and illustrations of ancient civilisations, carvings and manuscripts that I found there really fuelled my imagination and have been my inspiration to this day.

At about age eleven  I was lucky enough to have an art teacher who had a great interest in calligraphy / lettering.  He taught us a form of italic script and issued licences, to those of us who became proficient enough, to use it in the classroom.  To my great shame, I never attained the standard required and so, was not allowed to use italics to write my essays and compositions.  I did, however, at that early age, have my own fountain pen.  I don’t remember how I came by it, but it was probably a Christmas or Birthday present.  This pen was an Osmiroid 65 with a medium italic nib and I was soon in great demand in the neighbourhood to write cards and envelopes and suchlike, but my first real commission, for which I received one shilling, was The Lord’s Prayer written in a spiral.  That pen was lost some time ago but lately I found another on eBay complete with ten nibs. Writing with it really brings back memories.  One other thing I was taught at that time has been a great help all through my life.  When drawing or colouring letters,  don’t turn the paper to give better access to the brush, crayon or whatever.  One day you might have to put your letters on a wall, so learn to always work  in the one position. (Except when doing this)…………………………..

 

 

Not my first commission, but very similar.
Here are a number of links and videos all with a view to teaching children to enjoy the making of good letters.  Whether you are a parent, a teacher, a youngster, or an older beginner, there will be much here to stir the interest and get you or your class started .  Don’t forget the links to “Lessons” on the right of this page and the many art / calligraphy based links to be found elsewhere at Bill’s Space.

A very interesting study of cursive writing /learning.” What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades”. “Does handwriting matter?”

Cursive writing under threat.

Doodling with double pencils or markers, and filling with colour is a very good introduction to learning how the thick and thin strokes are formed.

 

This one is from the Monica Dengo calligraphy teaching site.  In Italian but the enthusiasm shines through just the same.

 

 

An educational philosophy encompassing all creative subjects backs up the teaching of handwriting in France. The French believe that giving children the ability to write will free their minds to perform creatively throughout their lives. So they teach handwriting as a subject in its own right.And they teach handwriting in a uniform way throughout primary schools, using traditional calligraphy to produce a distinctive, ornate hand.This programme visits a school in Lyon to see how students in Year 1 and Year 6 develop this ability.

 

 

Calli and Graphy

Home Education Resources  Free printable practice sheets

Alphabet Handwriting worksheets plus colouring pages etc.

See also the rest of the series
Learn to Write Calligraphy

Teaching cursive

 

 

See also the rest of the series

As I come across new material on this subject, I shall add it on, so keep watching this space.

Graduation of the first Children’s Group at the Russian Contemporary Museum Of Calligraphy.

National Handwriting Association.

Berol Teachers Club

Meanwhile, colouring ready made letters is a good way of getting a feel for letterform, so here are a few to play with.  Print them off and have fun.



Enjoy.
Please let me know if there is anything you are unsure of.  If I don’t know the answer, I’m sure to know someone who does.

Easter day 2012


Easter Greetings to all my visitors and friends.

See also EASTER

 

Blowing my own trumpet.


 

The works I show here, were made for my own entertainment and first shown in my Facebook album “Just for Fun”.  They were given quite a good reception from those who saw them, so when I saw an invitation to enter the luton art’11 exhibition, I thought why not?  I had never previously entered an open exhibition even though Luton’s Annual art exhibition  has been a feature in the town way back since before I was born, which is a day or two!

So, on the submission date, off I went with my shortlist of three pieces, shown here lined up on the mantlepiece.  From left to right a quote from Friedrich Nietzsche and two versions of Aehd wishes for the cloths of heaven by WB Yeats.

You could have blown me down with a feather when I subsequently got notice that two of my pieces had been accepted.  Guess which………………………………..

 

If you live locally you can find out by going to have a look.  The exhibition is on until 26th February.  There is some lovely work on display.  Wardown Park  is a great setting so why not make a day of it?

If you can’t make it, keep watching this space.

ITALIC WORKSHEETS. With thanks to Richard Crookes. Updated May 11th ’11


Some time ago, you might remember, I mentioned that one of my friends might just happen to come up with a lesson on Italics and save me the trouble.

He heh.  Today he has graciously given his consent for me to show these pages he put together for a recent workshop he conducted in Thailand.  What a lovely job he has made of them.

If you would like to see more of Richard’s work, and download these worksheets, have a look at his Website.  Also he has Videos on YouTube.  Here is one to compliment these pages.

Many thanks Richard.  More power to your elbow.

(Update)

At last, Calligradoodles -0005 Italic minuscule.

Over all,  I am quite pleased, apart from one or two wayward ascenders.  Bear in mind that the x height here is one and a half inches ie five nib widths.

I have tried to give an indication of the rhythm generated by the italic script. Though the music is added after the video is published. it does seem to fit in quite nicely.

I hope you enjoy it and that it is some help.

UPDATE 11th May ’11

Once you have got your teeth into italics you will need some capitals. These are my version. It has taken some years to reach this stage. I strongly recommend that the beginner first studies Richard’s example before adding flourishes/swashes.

These are eight nibwidths in height. That is two and a half inches. You will note that the minuscule x height was five nibwidths / one and a half inches. Whatever you do with Initial capitals, the capitals within a body of script look more balanced and seem slightly weightier if kept to approximately half the height again of the minuscule.

Once again there are one or two letters here that have gone slightly awry. Rather than stopping to rub them out, thus spoiling the rhythm, I have again elected to carry on and show the whole sequence, warts and all.

You might also like to have a look at Lloyd Reynolds’ epic series.

If you have any questions regarding this lesson or any of the others, please ask them in the comment box. Others might like to see the answer too.

Keep watching this space.